Comedy

Shotgun Wedding, by Albert W. Vogt III

This past weekend had nothing remarkable released, so I did not go to the cinema.  It was just as well.  It was my birthday weekend and I felt like I had much better things to do than to sit through Infinity Pool.  Then again, the same could be said for today’s film, Shotgun Wedding (2022).  Why the different premier year, you may…

A Fish Called Wanda, by Albert W. Vogt III

There is much about A Fish Called Wanda (1988) that does not necessarily feed the soul.  That is, of course, what a Catholic reviewer such as myself prizes the most from a film.  There is dishonesty, infidelity, robbery, unfaithfulness, and violence.  It is also a comedy.  Sometimes these things can be funny, although I confess that I did not laugh as…

Little Fockers, by Albert W. Vogt III

As Little Fockers (2010) concluded, the third in a series of movies that piqued with the first, Meet the Parents (2000), a friend of mine who I was watching it with asked: “Is this the last one?”  “I hope so,” I responded.  Now that the viewing has concluded, I can take to the internet and say with some relief that, yes,…

Meet the Fockers, by Albert W. Vogt III

When I start something, I like to finish it.  If I do not, it ends up gnawing away at the back of my mind like a mental tapeworm.  Remember that book or series you began?  Remember that book or series you began?  Remember that book or series you began?  It is sort of like getting a song stuck in your…

Meet the Parents, by Albert W. Vogt III

Once more unto the breech that is Ben Stiller films of the late 1990s and early 2000s.  I do not think anyone did more romantic comedies during this period than did he.  I have reviewed many of them.  The majority of them are your garden variety fare for this genre.  Now, I would not necessarily argue that Meet the Parents (2000)…

Summer Rental, by Albert W. Vogt III

Whenever I think back on my education, I often forget that I also took a film class while studying for my Master’s degree in Florida Studies.  I will have to start giving reviews of those as I do not think there are any that I have addressed on The Legionnaire.  I got to thinking about this as I…

28 Days, by Albert W. Vogt III

What I thought would be a light-hearted comedy with 28 Days (2000) turned out to be a more serious look at an important issue.  I landed on it because it stars Sandra Bullock.  Call it what you will, but as I have said in reviews of her other work, I enjoy her movies.  As such, choosing this one was simply…

Addams Family Values, by Albert W. Vogt III

Incidentally, I only got a couple of episodes into Wednesday (2022 – present) before giving up.  My distaste is related to the warnings given under the ratings on Netflix.  I noticed that for today’s film, Addams Family Values (1993).  Under the PG-13 designation, it says “Macabre humor.”  The Oxford English Dictionary defines “macabre” as, “disturbing and horrifying because of involvement with or depiction of death…

The Addams Family (1991), by Albert W. Vogt III

With all the craze there is these days with the new Netflix series Wednesday (2022 – present), it should come as no surprise that the early 1990s movies on which, I suppose, they are based are on the same streaming service.  Actually, to do it complete justice, one needs to look to the original show, The Addams Family (1964-1966).  It is…

Clue, by Albert W. Vogt III

Who does not like a good murder mystery?  Actually, I am not overly fond of them.  For starters, they obviously involve somebody’s death.  That is never ideal.  Secondly, they have a tendency to become convoluted.  I suppose that is the nature of something that is a mystery.  If it were clearer, there would be no need for all the accoutrements that…

A Man Called Otto, by Albert W. Vogt III

Whatever is M3GAN (2022), I can all but guarantee you that it is not as good as A Man Called Otto (2022).  In writing that sentence, I realize that I sound a bit like the grumpy old man that is the title character in the latter, Otto Anderson (Tom Hanks).  We will get to that discussion in the next paragraph.  In the…

Sleeping Beauty, by Albert W. Vogt III

Perhaps The Legionnaire is bigger than even I realize?  It could be that in quantity of reviews, anyway.  When somebody recently suggested on social media that I review Disenchanted (2022), it came with the caveat that I should first watch Enchanted (2007).  Fine, says I, who am I to deny all my fan. . . ?  I liked neither of them, but dutiful wrote an…

Zoolander, by Albert W. Vogt III

Here is another entry from the golden age of Ben Stiller films: Zoolander (2001).  I have to confess to not being excited for this one when it came out.  I recall seeing previews for it in the theaters and thinking, what in the world. . . ?  It was not until well after it came out that finally got around…

Disenchanted, by Albert W. Vogt III

So, now that I have seen Enchanted (2007), does Disenchanted (2022) make more sense?  Honestly, I have no idea how to answer that question.  I suspect that I could have watched the second of these Disney fairy send-ups and I would have at least gotten the gist of what they were trying to accomplish.  Whether it lands is a separate debate.  What I…

The Banshees of Inisherin, by Cameron J. Czaja

It’s the new year and that means two things; one, it’s time to start making resolutions that I’ll give up by the end of the month and, two, it’s also the tail end of Oscar Season. For those of you who aren’t aware, Oscar season is basically that time of year where major Hollywood studios…

Do Revenge, by Albert W. Vogt III

One needs to be careful with Swedish films.  Recently, the suggestion was made on my social media that I review Do Revenge.  When I encounter a film that I have yet to hear of, I tend to go straight to Amazon Prime.  If it is not available for free, I rent it, a feature that Netflix has yet to…

How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, by Albert W. Vogt III

Days like today are proof that God has a hand in your life.  I am writing this on a Friday, which is usually the day I go to the theater.  As it turns out, there are no major releases this weekend, unless you count films like Emancipation.  As you can see that on Apple TV+, I reasoned, why make…

Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery, by Albert W. Vogt III

Perhaps I should be a more attentive film reviewer?  Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery (henceforth just Glass Onion because I do not feel like writing all of that out every time) had been suggested to me on social media to watch and critique.  This was not too onerous of a task as I intended to see it anyway.  Herein…

Puss in Boots: The Last Wish, by Albert W. Vogt III

By now, if you have been reading The Legionnaire for some time, I would think you would know what a release of an animated movie means for me.  If you are new, I will spell it out anyway: I gather my nieces and head to the cinema.  One day, they will get too old for these things, or so…

Falling for Christmas, by Albert W. Vogt III

We all remember Lindsay Lohan’s debut in the 1998 remake of the Disney classic The Parent Trap.  And somewhat recently I was fortunate to finally catch up with seemingly the rest of humanity by watching Mean Girls (2004).  What did Lohan do since then?  The movie that, unfortunately, sticks out for me is Machete (2010).  I do not think I made it through the…

I Believe in Santa, by Albert W. Vogt III

It is official: I now live in a bizarro world.  I have not been watching many Christmas movies this year, mostly because I have been trying to keep up with a myriad of things going on right now.  As of this writing, we are now a week away from the day we celebrate Christ’s coming into the…

The Devil Wears Prada, by Albert W. Vogt III

As a rule, I try not to watch movies that have the word “devil” in the title.  Usually they are horror movies, and those I specifically avoid.  Otherwise, they are connected to some form of sin, which should not come as a surprise to anyone.  The enemy is not in the sanctification business.  And then there is The Devil Wears…

Tommy Boy, by Albert W. Vogt III

You know how there is a cliché about old people not knowing how to handle technology?  That was not true for my grandfather.  Unfortunately, he passed away before the rise of streaming.  He was also not long for the world of the DVD. He was a wizard, though, of the VHS tape.  What I am about to tell you is…

Garden State, by Albert W. Vogt III

There are movies that you see once, maybe twice, but leave an impression on you all the same.  Garden State (2004) is one of them.  I will not be recommending it, and you will see why as this review unfolds.  There are too many aspects of it that, as I have grown in my Faith, I cannot look at…

Violent Night, by Albert W. Vogt III

When I first say the trailer for Violent Night, I thought it was a joke.  With my mouth slightly agape for a few seconds afterwards, I seriously believed that what I witnessed, like Santa Clause himself, was not real.  We Catholics have the genuine article of St. Nicholas, but for all intents and purposes, none of the traditions…

Baby Mama, by Albert W. Vogt III

My love of Parks and Recreation (2009-2015) is well documented.  If you are new to The Legionnaire, now you know.  It is because of the dear place that show holds in my heart that I noticed a long-forgotten film from the deep recesses of my memory, Baby Mama (2008).  It stars two best friends who are that way both on and off the…

Strange World, by Albert W. Vogt III

The de facto chorus in “America” (1968) by Simon and Garfunkel talks of going to look for the title country.  It is about two people, boyfriend and girlfriend presumably, who board a bus in their quest.  They spend most of their trip observing either the people around them or the scenery they pass.  At one point, the man…

Murder Mystery, by Albert W. Vogt III

There is never any reason to watch an Adam Sandler movie, and I am including any of his so-called “classics.”  Perhaps I am being uncharitable.  Yet, outside of 50 First Dates (2004), you can keep the lot of them.  At the same time, I have The Legionnaire to consider.  If there is one thing for which you can credit Sandler, it is that…

Rush Hour 3, by Albert W. Vogt III

Well, let us get this over with, finally.  If you have read the reviews of Rush Hour (1998) and Rush Hour 2 (2001), you might have noticed my lack of enthusiasm.  The next logical question then is: why do it?  There is nobody anywhere telling me to continue writing The Legionnaire.  The only explanation I can give you is that it is Faith.  There is…

Rush Hour 2, by Albert W. Vogt III

Well, here we go with Rush Hour 2 (2001).  Pardon me if that is not the most enthusiastic of starts.  In reflecting just this moment, I ask myself: why did we ever like these movies?  To be fair, there are worse films.  I have reviewed some of the most unwatchable pieces of cinema known to man.  Yet, this trilogy bears a little…

Rush Hour, by Albert W. Vogt III

I have a theory that every show on television is cop show.  Even the shows that are not cop shows are cop shows.  Shows.  This commentary is equal parts in reference to the formulaic nature of pretty much everything you see, and my annoyance with the rest.  With streaming services these days, it is even harder to find something…

See How They Run, by Albert W. Vogt III

When See How They Run debuted in theaters this year, I intended to see it.  Unfortunately, it came out the same weekend as The Woman King.  I am one person, and I tend not to force Cameron to reviewing anything.  He has his own life to live, though I appreciate any contribution he gives.  Throw in the rest of the usual excuses…

Failure to Launch, by Albert W. Vogt III

Did you know that Terry Bradshaw has had a very small acting career?  It is okay if that name does not immediately ring a bell.  If you watch football at all, it might be a little more familiar.  He is a former Super Bowl winning quarterback, and current analyst for Fox’s pre-game Sunday show during the National Football…

What’s Your Number?, by Albert W. Vogt III

Something made me think of Anna Faris today.  Actually, she is never too far from my thoughts as I am a huge fan of the show that made her ex-husband, Chris Pratt, a star, Parks and Recreation (2009-2015).  I see him and sometimes think what a shame it is that their relationship ended.  Whatever it was that specifically brought Faris…

Police Academy, by Albert W. Vogt III

It is Halloween.  People dress as cops on that day, right?  We will call this the excuse for watching Police Academy (1984).  Actually, a bigger reason would be the fact that I had never seen it.  It is simultaneously logical and strange that this would be the case.  As a child of the 1980s, like everyone else then, I knew about…

Weird: The Al Yankovic Story, by Albert W. Vogt III

If you are a child of the 1980s like I am, you probably have a greater appreciation for “Weird” Al Yankovic than most other generations.  You could hardly be aware of a popular song from that decade for too long before Yankovic released a hilarious parody of it.  There are some who say parodies are mean.  I am…

Bruce Almighty, by Albert W. Vogt III

Even I was surprised that I had yet to review Bruce Almighty (2003).  It is an interesting film on many levels, particularly for an avowed Catholic film critic.  In my career working for the Church, every once in a while the idea for showing a film on for whatever parish I was working with would be floated.  In case you…

Freaky Friday, by Albert W. Vogt III

There is another Jamie Lee Curtis film that is out right now that I suppose is a little more seasonally appropriate.  But since I do not care two bits about Halloween, I will not be reviewing the movie of the same name, even if it does have the tantalizingly hopeful subtitle of “Ends.”  Perhaps Cameron will take…

The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad, by Albert W. Vogt III

Now to once more dig into my favorite Disney films, and those are of the more obscure variety.  I have probably already explained this before, but back when the Disney Channel started, with cable television in its infancy (yes, I am that old), they had to find programming.  Lots and lots of programming.  During the day, when I…

Ticket to Paradise, by Albert W. Vogt III

Before getting into this review in earnest, I should be charitable myself.  I wanted to start by saying that I am getting old.  No longer do I go to the theater on a whim and decide to see whatever is playing next.  My careful choices involve booking my seat online, which indicates forethought.  This is when my first surprise…

Dinner for Schmucks, by Albert W. Vogt III

Does watching two Paul Rudd films back-to-back constitute a Paul Rudd kick?  Do such labels matter?  At any rate, recently I watched I Love You, Man (2009).  My next choice was Dinner for Schmucks (2010).  The star of each is, you guessed it, Paul Rudd.  In reflecting on this sequence, it made me wonder about actors and actresses that have been in the Marvel…

Shaolin Soccer, by Albert W. Vogt III

My nostalgia strikes me in different ways at different times.  Gosh, that makes nostalgia sound like a medical condition.  Actually, in some way it can be something that you eventually need to treat, especially if you let it consume your life to the point that you are stuck living in the past.  It is a fine line between…

Mr. & Mrs. Smith, by Albert W. Vogt III

Do you remember when Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt got together?  I do not mean being in the same film with each other, though I am talking about Mr. & Mrs. Smith (2005) today.  Instead, I am referring to the time shortly before what the world came to know as “Brangelina,” when they had separate lives, indeed relationships.  Memory tells…

I Love You, Man, by Albert W. Vogt III

One of the promises I made to myself when I started The Legionnaire is that I would not review pornography.  I almost broke that promise.  I had been seeing Blonde pop up on Netflix, as well as some other film sites.  Given my history background, I was curious how they would portray one of the more complex characters Hollywood has ever produced…

A Knight’s Tale, by Albert W. Vogt III

Recently, I reviewed Hocus Pocus 2.  Typically, this would have been something I avoided had it not been for a slow weekend at the cinema.  In either case, it was new and it was out, and I always try to give my reviews of new releases on Mondays, or Tuesdays if Cameron has something.  If you read my review…

Rosaline, by Albert W. Vogt III

There is a movie coming out at the end of this month called Prey for the Devil.  It has been a part of the trailer package for the majority of the films I have seen in the theater for months.  I have no desire to watch it, but it does appear to directly deal with the Catholic Church…

Gremlins 2: The New Batch, by Albert W. Vogt III

I seem to be reviewing a lot of sequels lately.  They can be tricky to do because as follow ups to usually more popular originals, it is difficult to say anything new about them.  When a film does well, a studio is hesitant to go in a direction that deviates from the formula that brought the first…

While You Were Sleeping, by Albert W. Vogt III

The other day when I reviewed Pretty in Pink (1986), I mentioned how watching it is like a stroll down memory lane given that it is set in Elgin, Illinois, a couple towns north from where I was born.  I had not seen While You Were Sleeping (1995) until recently, but it made me remember that my nostalgia for…

Pitch Perfect 3, by Albert W. Vogt III

As stated in my review of Pitch Perfect 2 (2015), they should have ended the proceedings before getting to a trilogy.  I do not think I am alone in this opinion.  Not appearing in Pitch Perfect 3 (2017) is Jesse Swanson (Skylar Astin), main protagonist Beca Mitchell’s (Anna Kendrick) boyfriend in the first two movies.  A little research on this subject says…

Pitch Perfect 2, by Albert W. Vogt III

One of the more clichéd statements in cinematic history is that the first in a franchise, series, trilogy, or whatever you want to call it, is always the best.  I cannot argue against this statement, though there are examples of the subsequent entries living up to their predecessor.  The gold standard for this, of course, is the…

Pitch Perfect, by Albert W. Vogt III

Despite nearing 1,000 reviews on The Legionnaire, if you were to give me a film title, I could tell you whether or not there is a write up about it.  This is helped by the fact that I have posted each one with these tired old hands of mine.  I also pride myself on my ability to recall…

Amsterdam, by Albert W. Vogt III

Trailer expectation is a thing.  A phrase like that could indicate something bad or good.  At the end of the day, taste will determine which side of that divide on which you fall.  Either way, trailers are meant to build expectations.  That is their reason for existence.  The hope is that they will get you wanting to see the movie…

Pretty in Pink, by Albert W. Vogt III

My fairly recent viewing of Not Another Teen Movie (2001) made me realize that I had never seen Pretty in Pink (1986).  That is a bold statement for a native Chicagoan and lover of many of John Hughes’ films.  He is responsible for writing and/or directing a slew of movies during the 1980s, all of which are centered on my beloved…

The Spy Next Door, by Albert W. Vogt III

Perhaps I am getting to that age when I am not understanding youth culture anymore.  Recently, one of my adult friends asked me to review The Spy Next Door (2010).  I always agree to these requests, and had every intention of doing so.  But, life, etc., etc., etc. . . .  Then I spent a week with my sister’s family awaiting…

Hocus Pocus 2, by Albert W. Vogt III

This time of year is not my favorite.  My apologies to anyone who enjoy the approach of Halloween, but I stopped liking that event when I got too old to go trick-or-treating.  It seems to me that the only reason many adults celebrate it is because they want an excuse to behave in a wildly inappropriate manner.  I…

PCU, by Albert W. Vogt III

When I began expanding The Legionnaire to include all movies, not just new releases, many of my favorite films of all time were addressed early on in this process.  There is one, though, that did not make it onto my blog at that time.  That movie is PCU (1994).  Admittedly, there have been a few reviews that I have written from memory,…

Legally Blonde 2: Red, White & Blonde, by Albert W. Vogt III

For a complete rendering of why I love Legally Blonde (2001), please read my review of it.  In short, my appreciation revolves around the character of Elle Woods (Reese Witherspoon).  Perhaps there is some cliché to being into a movie because of its star.  I like most Reese Witherspoon films.  Yet, there is something about the innocent but determined nature of…

The Perfect Score, by Albert W. Vogt III

When I was in high school, I prepared for the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) by reading a book called Up Your Score: The Underground Guide to the SAT.  I was an idiot back in those days, though such is the foolishness of youth.  I was aware of the myriad of other preparation materials, but my perusal of them…

Midnight in Paris, by Albert W. Vogt III

Occasionally, a film comes along that captures your imagination.  Midnight in Paris (2011) is one such film.  My only regret is that I did not see it sooner, and I could not tell you why this was the case.  I am not necessarily a Woody Allen hater, despite his odd choice of spouse.  That is a story for another time.  As…

Julie & Julia, by Albert W. Vogt III

My friend and fellow Catholic Sarah has a great blog dedicated to the art of cooking called “Simply Scrumptious by Sarah.”  I cannot emphasize the word “art” enough, and it is fitting given today’s review of Julie & Julia (2009).  Not to get ahead of myself, but the basic premise of the movie is frustrated worker Julie Powell (Amy…

WALL-E, by Albert W. Vogt III

There is a faint memory in the back of my brain of seeing a preview for WALL-E (2008) and thinking that Disney was doing a strange sequel to a personal childhood favorite of mine, Short Circuit (1986).  The title character of the former looks like a cute version of Johnny 5 (voiced by Tim Blaney) in the latter.  They have similar…

Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous, by Albert W. Vogt III

Here we go with another Sandra Bullock film with Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous (2005).  That sounds more uncharitable than is intended.  As I have said in other reviews of her films, I enjoy her work.  Still, they are kind of redundant.  Her sense of humor shines through, but the plots are usually similar.  That is why I appreciate a film…

The Ugly Truth, by Albert W. Vogt III

One would not call me a relationship expert.  I would not, anyway.  While I am currently pursuing a different path, had it worked differently with the women with which I have been involved, things would be different.  This is not intended as nostalgia or, worse yet, regret.  Instead, I am trying to establish my modesty credentials, if you will,…

Three Men and a Baby, by Albert W. Vogt III

Often films have great little tidbits of trivia attached to them.  Take today’s movie, for example: Three Men and a Baby (1987).  It is little remembered these days, but it had a bit of a buzz around the time of its release, so much so that it got a sequel, 1990’s Three Men and a Little Lady.  There are some…

13 Going On 30, by Albert W. Vogt III

Who does not like Big (1988), starring Tom Hanks?  If you do not like it, it is probably because you have not seen it.  I cannot say that I would blame you.  Who watches movies from the 1980s anymore?  I feel bad for films that came out before that decade.  The reason I bring up this point is to illustrate the way…

Mr. Right, by Albert W. Vogt III

Rumor has it that Netflix is on its way out.  If so, that will save me $20 a month, which I gladly pay for the people who also use my account.  Until then, it is a useful thing to have to peruse when inspiration is not striking me as readily as it does at other times.  While scrolling…

Not Another Teen Movie, by Albert W. Vogt III

There is a lot that is wrong with Not Another Teen Movie (2001).  At the same time, there is a limited way to appreciate a film that features overt sibling attractions and whole host of other objectionable material that almost made this Catholic reviewer turn it off.  The amount of stuff I would rather not see starts from the…

Coming 2 America, by Albert W. Vogt III

I enjoyed Coming to America (1988) as much as the next person.  Yes, there were some moments in that I would have preferred not to have seen.  Why some films, be they comedies like this one, or anything else, needs to have blatant nudity in them is beyond me.  Yet, that is not the point of the film.  Instead, it is…

Due Date, by Albert W. Vogt III

When an actor/actress plays one character for so long, I often wonder whether they will ever be able to shake the connection to that franchise.  After all, for them it is simply a job.  They are not actually that character.  On the other hand, as something they do to pay the bills (and I wish they would pay…

Superbad, by Albert W. Vogt III

Recently, I reviewed Old School (2003).  In discussing it, I talked about how there is a dividing line, especially in cinema, between the things we do when we are in school and as adults.  That film attempts to bridge the gap between these two states of cultural existence.  Though in the same sort of vein as what I talk about…

Old School, by Albert W. Vogt III

As we matriculate through the grades, there is a sense that the next stage is when things will be different.  We tend to look at our current situation with all its cares and worries and see nothing but problems.  This notion, combined with our lack of maturity in our developmental years, makes us wish when we are…

Honk for Jesus. Save Your Soul., by Albert W. Vogt III

Life is hard enough without putting added pressure on yourself.  This is a lesson that I am still learning.  The past few weeks have been draining.  Even the time spent in the last few days getting away from it all were taxing.  Further, upon returning home, I was reminded that the House of Prayer in Clearwater, Florida, was re-commencing…

The Break-Up, by Albert W. Vogt III

As those of you who pay attention to such things may remember, I am a sucker for movies that are set in Chicago.  In a sense, I feel I have a personal connection today’s film, The Break-Up (2006).  Okay, it is a very limited “sense.”  The male lead is Gary Grobowski (Vince Vaughn), a Chicago Polish name if I ever…

The Graduate, by Albert W. Vogt III

When I was accepted for my Ph.D. degree program in American History at Loyola University Chicago, I was late in signing up for courses.  My experience during my Master’s degree program in Florida Studies at the University of South Florida – St. Petersburg was that these matters would take care of themselves.  The classes were essentially made…

Wild Wild West, by Albert W. Vogt III

Believe it or not, I can remember a time before streaming services, and before cable television even, when the choices for your evening entertainment were limited to the few channels your antenna could receive.  I have most of the modern conveniences today, and yet I live in a house that still relies on an antenna.  But that…

Easy A, by Albert W. Vogt III

One of the many maxims with which we are brought up is that “honesty if the best policy.”  Whether you are a practicing Catholic like me, or someone simply trying to live a good life (there are some graces in such a commitment), being truthful will take you far.  There are also some, particularly as you get…

What Women Want, by Albert W. Vogt III

The premise of What Women Want (2000) is so blindingly obvious that I wondered why it has not been made prior to 2000.  Turns out there are other iterations of this title, but this is the one with which I am familiar.  The reason for my curiosity stems from something that I think everyone has wanted at one point…

Be Kind Rewind, by Albert W. Vogt III

My first exposure to director Michel Gondry’s work was Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004).  I love that movie.  Such is my admiration for that work that I was pumped to see Dave Chappelle’s Block Party (2005), though that probably had more to do with Dave Chappelle.  I say that because while I liked Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, I did…

The Bells of St. Mary’s, by Albert W. Vogt III

Defining The Bells of St. Mary’s (1945) is tricky in a limited sense.  Obviously, it is a Catholic movie.  If the title does not clue you into this fact, then it would become apparent after a couple minutes of watching it.  The frankly insignificant mystery of the film is whether it is a sequel to Going My Way (1944).  Bing Crosby is back…

Going My Way, by Albert W. Vogt III

When I began The Legionnaire, one of my initial thoughts was to not talk about movies that are self-consciously Catholic.  My logic was to cover the ones that have nothing to do with my Faith in order to show how aspects of popular motion pictures can reveal Christianity.  Often, this takes some mental gymnastics, but the effort is…

Without a Paddle, by Cameron J. Czaja

Do you remember a time where the only way to watch movies on tv without commercials, and completely unedited, was through premium channels such as HBO and Showtime? That seems like a bygone era in retrospect due to streaming now being prevalent, though that pretty much summed up the late 1990s and most of the…

When Harry Met Sally, by Albert W. Vogt III

One of the first things you see in When Harry Met Sally (1989) is the campus of the University of Chicago.  This got me geeked.  I tried twice, unsuccessfully, to get into this school for my graduate studies in history.  It is not just the fact that it is located in the greatest city in the world, a scientifically proven…

Easter Sunday, by Albert W. Vogt III

I wish I had seen Easter Sunday with my friend.  Weeks ago, when I first heard that this was coming out (as he apparently had, too), we discussed meeting up to see it together.  Geography and schedules prevented this from happening. Circumstances last weekend kept me from getting to the theater when it premiered, so I am behind.  I do not…

Warm Bodies, by Albert W. Vogt III

With Shaun of the Dead (2004), you have a great movie that spoofs the zombie sub-genre of horror.  It is that good because not only does it send up many of the classic tropes you expect from such movies, but there is also British wit and a plot.  Zombieland (2009) is on the same level.  In fact, outside of the original Night…

Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle, by Albert W. Vogt III

There are some things that I have never done in my life that seem to surprise people when I admit to them my inexperience.  One of these is drugs.  Forgive me for sounding like a complete dweeb, but there is not a single drug of which I partook.  Since today I am reviewing is Harold & Kumar Go to…

EuroTrip, by Albert W. Vogt III

How immature we all were at one time.  In my late teens and early twenties, whenever some dumb, sex-joke fueled comedy came to the theater, I used to see them as a matter of course.  With this, I give you EuroTrip (2004), which, in addition to having the childish humor already mentioned, relies on every conceivable stereotype about Europe…

Bullet Train, by Albert W. Vogt III

Previews are a double-edged sword.  I never skip them when I go to the movies, and I get annoyed with myself when I get to the theater after they have completed.  Luckily, this has happened only a few times as I routinely arrive at least a half hour before start time.  As somebody who goes every weekend, I…

DC League of Super-Pets, by Albert W. Vogt III

The summer is coming to a close.  Who am I kidding?  I live in Florida.  Summer will be with us well into October, meteorologically speaking.  There is a sobering thought as I sit here on a sweltering Friday evening doing my best to ignore the need for air conditioning.  At least it is quiet, relatively speaking.  The old man I live…

Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad!, by Albert W. Vogt III

Believe it or not, there was a time when Orenthal James “O.J.” Simpson was not known for allegedly killing Nicole Brown and Ron Goldman.  I say “allegedly” because while he was acquitted of those charges, public opinion begs to differ.  He later went to jail for other reasons.  Yet, before his legal troubles began, he turned a hall…

The Kid, by Albert W. Vogt III

When you think about the silent film era, if you think about it at all, there is probably one name, and one name only, that comes to mind: Charlie Chaplin.  There were other stars of this early age of cinema before sound.  Have you ever heard of Douglas Fairbanks?  Lillian Gish?  Fatty Arbuckle?  I did not make up that last…

No Strings Attached, by Albert W. Vogt III

Recently, I reviewed This Means War (2012), a somewhat funny romantic comedy with Reese Witherspoon that has two spies competing for her affections.  A brief, but no less important moment in the film is when she decides to have sex with both of them as the deciding factor between the two.  In my article, I railed against this as…

This Means War, by Albert W. Vogt III

Offhand, I cannot think of too many films in which Reese Witherspoon appears that I do not enjoy.  There has always been something genuine about her that I appreciate.  I have seen Sweet Home Alabama (2002) dozens of times, and I love Legally Blonde (2001) as much as the next person.  I have also already reviewed both of those movies.  One of…

The Love Bug, by Albert W. Vogt III

On Disney+, at least on my version of the home screen, there is often a section titled “Nostalgic movies.”  Sometimes it is there, sometimes it is not, and I have no idea when it will display.  The artificial intelligence controlling these things is a fickle creature.  When it does come up, it speaks to an old fuddy-duddy like…

The Absent Minded Professor, by Albert W. Vogt III

Yes, I know there is an updated version of Disney’s The Absent-Minded Professor (1961), 1997’s Robin Williams led Flubber.  Whether you like it or not, Disney is always taking its older films and doing re-imaginings or remakes or whatever it is you want to call them.  There are so many of these that you could be tempted to accuse the…

Charlie Bartlett, by Albert W. Vogt III

Admittedly, Charlie Bartlett (2007) is not a movie with which many are familiar.  That is a bit of a shame.  It is one of the first big breaks for a talented actor whose life was cut tragically short, Anton Yelchin, who plays the title character.  It has a personal favorite, Kat Dennings, as the main female lead Susan Gardner.  It is…

Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit, by Albert W. Vogt III

A movie like Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit (1993) can tell you all you need to know about what Hollywood thinks of Catholicism.  It is not all bad.  It is not all good, either.  In fact, the majority of it is enough to make you clutch your Rosary beads just a little tighter in frustration.  On my dissertation committee…

Grosse Pointe Blank, by Albert W. Vogt III

They say there is no going home.  I am not on board with this philosophy.  For me, home is a suburb of Chicago, though I include the entire metropolitan area in this construction.  I try to go home as often as possible.  A visit up there means a return to our favorite hot dog stand (in reality, it is…

Never Been Kissed, by Albert W. Vogt III

There are not too many movies that I can think of with Drew Barrymore in them that I do not enjoy.  Some of them are silly.  The Charlie’s Angels movies are in this category.  The two that stand out the most are 50 First Dates (2004) and Fever Pitch (2005).  Because my focus has been on building the number of reviews I have ready to…

You’ve Got Mail, by Albert W. Vogt III

We will call this one, You’ve Got Mail (1998), a coming back to earth after making the leap to National Lampoon’s Van Wilder (2002) following my slog through the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise.  You can also think of it as yours truly landing on the next familiar title to come up on one of my streaming services, and with which I…